Baseball

#37 waiver trade deadline

Tonight is the waiver trade deadline, last month was the non-waiver trade deadline, and there has already been a couple deals that were made. The main difference is money, the non-waiver deadline doesn’t matter who it is no one is off limits now the waiver deadline is for the major leaguers who pass through waivers which is usually the guys who are paid some money. Examples are Jay Bruce and Curtis Granderson who have already been dealt during this waiver period. Like I said it’s basically about money so I don’t have much to say about the trading teams return so basically I’ll just be mentioning the main part.

First one was Cameron Maybin going from the Angels to the Astros. Not even sure he’ll get any playing time on the ‘Stros but he’s another athletic outfielder the Astros get to use off the bench. Which they already have plenty of, the rich get richer.

And then the Angels get Justin Upton from the Tigers. Upton is having a good year and has an opt-out clause in his contract after this year, because of his bounce back year the Tigers were pretty sure he would opt-out after the year anyway so might as well trade him and get something in return (even a small return) while you can. And all I got to say about this deal is throw Upton in a lineup with Mike Trout and I consider that a definite upgrade, especially for an Angels team that’s currently in the playoffs/wildcard hunt.

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Baseball

#17 congrats to all

There have been a few note worthy things that have happened in baseball recently, so today I’m going to write a post that highlights them all instead of a long post about just one subject. I’ve been pretty good at keeping them about one subject so far this year but there is plenty I could write about today so I figured I’ll just write a paragraph about each subject.

First and foremost I’ve got to congratulate Albert Pujols for joining the 600 homerun club. More people have walked on the moon than hit 600 homers in the majors, that is such an interesting fact. Even though he has to share the club with obvious juicers, Sammy Sosa and Alex Rodriguez, it is still an incredible feat. The machine is 37 years young, the future hall of famer would only need to hit 20 homers a year for the next 5 years to join the even more exclusive 700 homerun club. It’s possible.

Another career feat to congratulate, Clayton Kershaw has joined the 2,000 strikeout club. It’s not too exclusive of a club but it’s impressive because of what it means for the future, in my opinion at least. Kershaw is still only 29 years old, he isn’t even over the hump yet he has a lot of pitches left in that left arm of his. Pitchers are more of an injury risk than position players, they can just hurt something very small and it can derail the rest of their career, just look at Mark Prior’s career. So if Kershaw can stay healthy there is a good chance he can reach 3,000 strikeouts. Knock on wood.

And of course I have to mention the no-hitter that happened over the weekend. Edinson Volquez fired the first no-no of 2017 against a good hitting Diamondbacks team, and only needed 98 pitches to do it. Throughout Volquez’s entire career he’s either been hot or cold, you know he’s either an above average pitcher or someone that makes you wonder why he’s still in the rotation no real in between. He’s 2-7 this year but yet he has the only no-hitter this year, that makes my point. It’s still impressive to throw a no-hitter no matter who you are so congratulations Edinson.

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Baseball

#14 this version of Trout

I couldn’t really think of anything to write about today so I’m going to write/rant a little about Mike Trout, something I’ve been thinking about for a couple weeks. More specifically I want to write about how his game has changed the last couple years, in my opinion for the better. I’m not saying Mike Trout himself is getting better, was already crazy talented, it’s more that his mindset has changed. Before I get into it I have to say something, why on earth are pitchers still trying to get him out with pitches down in the zone? He is a great low ball hitter, his uppercut makes hitting a low pitch way too easy, I’ve noticed that (since he came up) that he can’t touch a fastball up in zone. Not just the upper 90’s fastball up either he has problems with the mediocre 89-90 mph fastballs that are up, but yet they still throw him low breaking/offspeed stuff? I just don’t get it.

Sorry for the rant I’ll get into it now. My point to this post is to talk about how Mike Trout has changed his game. Those of you who know me or have read this blog the last couple years know that I don’t think Mike Trout is the best player in baseball. Yes, Trout puts up great numbers almost every year but when you look at his tools, they’re obviously good but I just think there are a few players out there with better all around tools. The point I’m trying to make is Mike Trout went from a .280 hitter with 40 bombs but would strike out 180-200 times to the more all around player that’s a legitimate 30 homers 30 stolen bases threat. Hitting well over .300 while going 30/30 is so much better than just being a traditional homer or strikeout kind of power hitter. How many legit 30/30 guys are out there? Not that many. How many traditional power hitters that strike out a bunch? Those are a dime a dozen. Like I said I really believe that it’s simply just his mindset, he decided after a couple years of just being a regular power hitter that he wants to put the ball in play more and that can help a batting average tremendously. In turn he’s on base more and to help the team he’s stealing more bases. And this is the new Mike Trout and when people say this Mike Trout is the best player in baseball it doesn’t bother me as much as it used to. Something to keep an eye on though, his swing percentage is the highest it’s ever been he’s still a disciplined hitter but still.

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